Chuck Hagel’s Questionable Election Wins

This  article by Thom Hartmann from ten years 0ld ago seems relevant (or at least interesting) as former Senator Chuck Hagel awaits confirmation as Secretary of Defense:

“If You Want To Win An Election, Just Control The Voting Machines”

By Thom Hartmann/ Common Dreams/ January 31, 2003

Maybe Nebraska Republican Chuck Hagel honestly won two US Senate elections. Maybe it’s true that the citizens of Georgia simply decided that incumbent Democratic Senator Max Cleland, a wildly popular war veteran who lost three limbs in Vietnam, was, as his successful Republican challenger suggested in his campaign ads, too unpatriotic to remain in the Senate. Maybe George W. Bush, Alabama’s new Republican governor Bob Riley, and a small but congressionally decisive handful of other long-shot Republican candidates really did win those states where conventional wisdom and straw polls showed them losing in the last few election cycles.

Perhaps, after a half-century of fine-tuning exit polling to such a science that it’s now sometimes used to verify how clean elections are in Third World countries, it really did suddenly become inaccurate in the United States in the past six years and just won’t work here anymore. Perhaps it’s just a coincidence that the sudden rise of inaccurate exit polls happened around the same time corporate-programmed, computer-controlled, modem-capable voting machines began recording and tabulating ballots.

But if any of this is true, there’s not much of a paper trail from the voters’ hand to prove it.

You’d think in an open democracy that the government – answerable to all its citizens rather than a handful of corporate officers and stockholders – would program, repair, and control the voting machines. You’d think the computers that handle our cherished ballots would be open and their software and programming available for public scrutiny. You’d think there would be a paper trail of the vote, which could be followed and audited if a there was evidence of voting fraud or if exit polls disagreed with computerized vote counts.

You’d be wrong.

voting machines[3]

The respected Washington, DC publication The Hill (www.thehill.com/news/012903/hagel.aspx) has confirmed that former conservative radio talk-show host and now Republican U.S. Senator Chuck Hagel was the head of, and continues to own part interest in, the company that owns the company that installed, programmed, and largely ran the voting machines that were used by most of the citizens of Nebraska.

Back when Hagel first ran there for the U.S. Senate in 1996, his company’s computer-controlled voting machines showed he’d won stunning upsets in both the primaries and the general election. The Washington Post (1/13/1997) said Hagel’s “Senate victory against an incumbent Democratic governor was the major Republican upset in the November election.” According to Bev Harris of www.blackboxvoting.org, Hagel won virtually every demographic group, including many largely Black communities that had never before voted Republican. Hagel was the first Republican in 24 years to win a Senate seat in Nebraska.

Six years later Hagel ran again, this time against Democrat Charlie Matulka in 2002, and won in a landslide. As his hagel.senate.gov website says, Hagel “was re-elected to his second term in the United States Senate on November 5, 2002 with 83% of the vote. That represents the biggest political victory in the history of Nebraska.”

What Hagel’s website fails to disclose is that about 80 percent of those votes were counted by computer-controlled voting machines put in place by the company affiliated with Hagel. Built by that company. Programmed by that company.

“This is a big story, bigger than Watergate ever was,” said Hagel’s Democratic opponent in the 2002 Senate race, Charlie Matulka (www.lancastercountydemocrats.org/matulka.htm). “They say Hagel shocked the world, but he didn’t shock me.”

Is Matulka the sore loser the Hagel campaign paints him as, or is he democracy’s proverbial canary in the mineshaft?

In Georgia, Democratic incumbent and war-hero Max Cleland was defeated by Saxby Chambliss, who’d avoided service in Vietnam with a “medical deferment” but ran his campaign on the theme that he was more patriotic than Cleland. While many in Georgia expected a big win by Cleland, the computerized voting machines said that Chambliss had won.

The BBC summed up Georgia voters’ reaction in a 6 November 2002 headline: “GEORGIA UPSET STUNS DEMOCRATS.” The BBC echoed the confusion of many Georgia voters when they wrote, “Mr. Cleland – an army veteran who lost three limbs in a grenade explosion during the Vietnam War – had long been considered ‘untouchable’ on questions of defense and national security.”

Between them, Hagel and Chambliss’ victories sealed Republican control of the Senate. Odds are both won fair and square, the American way, using huge piles of corporate money to carpet-bomb voters with television advertising. But either the appearance or the possibility of impropriety in an election casts a shadow over American democracy.

“The right of voting for representatives is the primary right by which all other rights are protected,” wrote Thomas Paine over 200 years ago. “To take away this right is to reduce a man to slavery..”

That slavery, according to Hagel’s last opponent Charlie Matulka, is at our doorstep.

“They can take over our country without firing a shot,” Matulka said, “just by taking over our election systems.”

Taking over our election systems? Is that really possible in the USA?

Bev Harris of www.talion.com and www.blackboxvoting.org has looked into the situation in depth and thinks Matulka may be on to something. The company tied to Hagel even threatened her with legal action when she went public about his company having built the machines that counted his landslide votes. (Her response was to put the law firm’s threat letter on her website and send a press release to 4000 editors, inviting them to check it out.

“I suspect they’re getting ready to do this all across all the states,” Matulka said in a January 30, 2003 interview. “God help us if Bush gets his touch screens all across the country,” he added, “because they leave no paper trail. These corporations are taking over America, and they just about have control of our voting machines.”

(Continued/ Read Entire Article Here)

Boldface added by BPR Editor
About these ads
This entry was posted in elections, politics and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Chuck Hagel’s Questionable Election Wins

  1. My research tells me Nebraska does use electronic voting machines and did so in the years cited by Thom Hartmann. I stand by this story. If you have reliable information that contradicts this story, I’d like to see it.

  2. Anne says:

    Nebraska doesn’t use voting machines. This is yellow journalism or some bad writer who doesn’t research is stories.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s